James Lincoln, Program Director

James Lincoln, MS, MEd, has been teaching Physics and other subjects to a wide range of students in Southern California for over 10 years. He has served as an AP Exam Reader three times and is currently the President of the Southern California American Association of Physics Teachers. He has also served as Vice President of SCAAPT during which cofounded the SCAAPT New Physics Teacher Workshop. James has won several science video contests and has consulted on TV’s “The Big Bang Theory,” WebTV’s “This vs. That” and the UCLA Physics Video project. James' educational interests include the History of Physics, Education of Women in Physics, and Science Video Production.

Contact James

James Lincoln (Photo)

Bryn Bishop

Bryn Bishop recognized her passion for teaching years after studying physics at UC Davis. While in Northern California, she began her high school teaching career and appreciated the support of NCNAAPT and their teaching workshops. Moving down to San Diego County in 2012, she soon found SCAAPT and the New Physics Teacher Workshops. Since 2012, she has been teaching physics, AP Physics B, AP Physics 1 and 2 courses, and now, NGSS aligned “Physics in the Universe - High School Three Course Model” in North San Diego County High Schools. She currently serves as Vice President for High Schools with SCAAPT. Bryn is totally stoked to be working with NPTW as she has directly benefited from the demos, labs, discussions, and giveaways from past workshops.

Bryn Bishop (Photo)

Frank Lee

Frank has taught physics since 2008 at an LAUSD public high school in Downtown Los Angeles. His background and interests include mechanical engineering, computer troubleshooting and technical support, web design and programming, education theory, and cognitive and behavioral psychology. Frank likes teaching

applications of physics to everyday life and finding and addressing student misconceptions.

Frank Lee (photo)

Lorand Irinyi

Although he has been teaching physics at all levels in San Diego high schools for only four years, Lorand has been involved in physics and the teaching of physics pretty much all his life, since his father was a physics teacher also. Lorand has a BA in Physics and a MEd in Comparative Education (which is basically about how physics is taught all over the world.) He was a project engineer in the technology industry for almost three decades before becoming a physics teacher. He saw the applied results of physics education and wanted to contribute his share towards improving high school physics education for students. He is very keen on presenting physics to students as what it really can be, namely, a fun, interesting subject that helps in understanding and explaining the physical world around us. He took this seriously enough to have driven to LA before SCAAPT brought its New Physics Teachers’ Workshop to San Diego. Now that SCAAPT presents its NPTW workshops in San Diego, he want to expand his active participation in the organization’s efforts to help new physics teachers find their footings in their most critical first years to make physics accessible, fun, and interesting to their students.

 

Bill Layton

Bill Layton is a retired High School physics teacher who has taught all levels of physics from the most basic to both Advanced Placement-B and Advanced Placement-C. He has continued to work in the UCLA physics department with undergraduate and graduate students preparing to teach secondary school science.  He is very active in the Southern California AAPT and has served in many positions including president and high school vice president.  Most recently he is a co-founder of the NPTW and has participated with the other three workshops leaders in all of the past workshops.  He enthusiastically supports the efforts of the NPTW and sincerely believes that new physics teachers will be helped with special attention and encouragement as they begin the arduous yet rewarding task of teaching physics. He also finds working with enthusiastic new physics teachers a very rewarding experience.


Bill Layton